Archive for February, 2010

Nanotech Membranes to Improve CO2 Capture?

Posted by on Thursday, 11 February, 2010

A new type of membrane has been internationally patented by researchers at The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. The membrane is made from a plastic material that has been structured by means of nanotechnology. It catches CO2 while other waste gases pass freely.

According to the scientists, the technology is effective, inexpensive and eco-friendly, and can be used for practically all types of CO2 removal from other gases. Its effectiveness increases proportionally to the concentration of CO2 in the gas.

This method, known as facilitated transport, is comparable to the way human lungs get rid of CO2 when we breathe: it is both a complex and an effective mechanism.

More from here


Geo-Processors Turns Bicarbonate Wastewater to Useful Products Using CO2

Posted by on Thursday, 11 February, 2010

Sydney based company Geo-Processors Pty Limited announced the completion of development of a breakthrough Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology following successful initial process trials.

The technology – identified as Carbon Capture and Products Recovery (CCPR) system – enables efficient capture of CO2 from ambient air or point-sources and then conversion to mineral byproducts for industrial use or recycling.

Central to this technology is the use of massive volumes of bicarbonate-rich water produced as waste water by oil/gas production, coal mining and coal power stations and desalination processes – currently a source of environmental concerns and operational costs.

More from here


New Copper Molecule Sucks Carbon Dioxide from Air

Posted by on Thursday, 11 February, 2010

A team at Leiden University have shown that a complex molecule containing atoms of copper can remove carbon dioxide, create useful chemical by-products, and return to its original state to repeat the process.

The technique appears to be an attractive way to capture carbon dioxide, but is still impractical for attempts at climate engineering, according to the researchers who have described their experiments in a paper published in the US journal Science.

Their studies have also shown that when raw materials are added to the complex, the carbon dioxide is used up to create industrially useful compounds such as oxalic acid.

More from here


Advanced Solvents Used in B&W PGG CO2 Capture in Pilot Plant Tests

Posted by on Thursday, 11 February, 2010

Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group, Inc. (B&W PGG) researchers have successfully captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from a pilot-scale, coal-fired boiler using advanced solvents and a proprietary CO2-capture process developed at the company’s research center in Barberton, Ohio. B&W PGG is an operating unit of The Babcock & Wilcox Company.

B&W PGG has conducted its first demonstration on flue gas from a coal-fired boiler at the company’s Regenerable Solvent Absorption Technology (RSATTM) Pilot Plant. Researchers were able to continuously remove more than 90 percent of the CO2 from the Small Boiler Simulator II’s flue gas stream using a fully integrated RSAT process. B&W PGG researchers are now evaluating proprietary solvents and characterizing their performance at this scale.

More from here


SkyMine from Skyonic – Baking Soda from CO2

Posted by on Thursday, 11 February, 2010

Can baking soda curb global warming? At least one company thinks the answer is yes.

Joe David Jones, the founder and CEO of Skyonic, has come up with an industrial process called SkyMine that captures 90 percent of the carbon dioxide coming out of smoke stacks and mixes it with sodium hydroxide to make sodium bicarbonate, or baking soda. The energy required for the reaction to turn the chemicals into baking soda comes from the waste heat from the factory.

The system also removes 97 percent of the heavy metals, as well as most of the sulfur and nitrogen compounds, Jones said.

Luminant, a utility formerly known as TXU, installed a pilot version of the system at its Big Brown Steam Electric Station in Fairfield, Texas, last year.

More from here


Artificial Trees for Synthetic CO2 Capture?

Posted by on Wednesday, 10 February, 2010

I’m sure you have heard of the technology in which artificial trees are used for capturing CO2. I can hear you asking, “Why do we need artificial trees when we can grow natural trees?”. Fair enough, but let’s try to understand these artificial trees folks have to say.

A new “air extractor” technology presented by Klaus Lackner, a professor of Geophysics at Columbia’s Earth Institute, absorbs carbon dioxide from any location on the planet. Airplane emissions can be captured next to the runway, or China’s emissions can be captured on the coasts of Los Angeles! At least, that’s the spiel.

The design of the tree is not finalized, but Lackner predicts that the device would look more like a post with venetian blinds strung across it; a box-shaped extractor raised about 1,000 feet tall, adorned with scaffolding lined with liquid sodium hydroxide (commonly known as lye). When exposed, sodium hydroxide (lye) is an absorbent of CO2. So, as air flows through the venetian blind “leaves of the tree”, the sodium hydroxide will bind the CO2, sifting out cleaner, about 70-90% less CO2 concentrated air on the other side.

No doubt, all these are interesting concepts. But at the end of day, we back to the same old questions of cost, performance and energy required. The artificial tree concept is of course right now very short on details, but it will be interesting to watch that space.

Source


Cryogenic Carbon Capture Cheaper Than Alternatives

Posted by on Wednesday, 10 February, 2010

The technology, known as Cryogenic Carbon Capture (CCC), offers a more practical, retrofit and cost effective solution to carbon capture than any existing technology.

Benefits of Cryogenic Carbon Capture:
• Energy Efficiency – The Cryogenic Carbon Capture process is substantially more energy efficient then alternative processes. Studies conducted by the US Department of Energy estimate competing carbon capture technologies’ energy requirements to be over 30% more than the CCC estimates. CCC demonstrates these clear energy and operational advantages while also capturing 99% of the CO2. Alternative technologies typically capture around 90% of the CO2.
• Lower Capital Costs – Cryogenic Carbon Capture is a true bolt-on technology that is easily retrofitable to nearly any existing process, thus leveraging existing infrastructure. When integrated in new plant constructions, CCC is able to replace other chemical treatments (including SO2 and Hg removal), offsetting a significant percentage of a new installation cost.
• Installation Advantages – CCC requires less water, and supports energy storage options more easily than other systems.

More from here


US DOE Award To Accelerate Breakthrough CO2 Compression Technology

Posted by on Wednesday, 10 February, 2010

The U.S. Department of Energy has announced that Ramgen Power Systems LLC, of Bellevue, Washington, has been awarded $20 million (US) in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to scale up a device that uses supersonic shockwaves to compress carbon dioxide (CO2) for capture and storage.

The funding from DOE’s Office of Fossil Energy and its National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will accelerate commercial deployment of the novel CO2 compressor, called the Rampressor, which can be used for carbon capture and storage in most industrial settings.

The Rampressor employs a fundamentally new technology that reduces the cost of compressing CO2 to achieve affordable carbon capture and storage. At the heart of this relatively simple device is a rotating disk that spins with enough speed to achieve supersonic compression effects in a stationary environment. Compared to conventional CO2 compressors, the Rampressor has fewer parts, a smaller footprint and lower overall system costs. In addition, the system generates higher quality heat, which can potentially be captured and used, further increasing the system’s efficiency.

More from here


Sargas, Norway Claims New Carbon Capture Technology

Posted by on Wednesday, 10 February, 2010

Tests of a new technology for capturing greenhouse gases from coal-fired power plants have achieved 95% cuts in a step towards new ways to fight climate change, a Norwegian company has said.

Sargas Technology Group claimed a breakthrough following recent tests of a prototype at the Vartan power plant in Stockholm. Tests by Sargas’ five-metre high system of pressurised filters, absorbers and condensers at Vartan — processing 60 kilograms of exhaust gases an hour — are capturing 95% of carbon dioxide, the company claims.
The system relies on existing technology adapted from the chemicals industry. The company said that the capture process costs just under US$20 a tonne of carbon dioxide.

A limitation of Sargas’ technology is that the system works under pressure and only a handful of coal-fired power plants in Sweden, Japan and Germany so far use the so-called Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion technology.

More from here


Selective CO2 Capturing Materials – ZIFs – to Result in Carbon Negative Power Production

Posted by on Wednesday, 10 February, 2010

Chemists from the University of California – Los Angeles (UCLA) have made a major advancement in the development of CO2 capturing materials, which they report in the Feb. 15 issue of the journal Science. The scientists have demonstrated that they can successfully isolate and capture carbon dioxide with a class of new materials known as zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs). Their findings could lead to power plants efficiently capturing the greenhouse gas without using toxic materials, after which it can be stored in geological formations. The new materials make carbon capture less energy demanding, and can store up to five times as much CO2 than porous carbon materials being designed for the same task.

More from here