Sargas, Norway Claims New Carbon Capture Technology

This entry was posted by Wednesday, 10 February, 2010
Read the rest of this entry »

Tests of a new technology for capturing greenhouse gases from coal-fired power plants have achieved 95% cuts in a step towards new ways to fight climate change, a Norwegian company has said.

Sargas Technology Group claimed a breakthrough following recent tests of a prototype at the Vartan power plant in Stockholm. Tests by Sargas’ five-metre high system of pressurised filters, absorbers and condensers at Vartan — processing 60 kilograms of exhaust gases an hour — are capturing 95% of carbon dioxide, the company claims.
The system relies on existing technology adapted from the chemicals industry. The company said that the capture process costs just under US$20 a tonne of carbon dioxide.

A limitation of Sargas’ technology is that the system works under pressure and only a handful of coal-fired power plants in Sweden, Japan and Germany so far use the so-called Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion technology.

More from here

One Response to “Sargas, Norway Claims New Carbon Capture Technology”

  1. Emily Carden

    Sargas technology group claimed a breakthrough following recent tests of a prototype at the Vartan power plant in Stockholm.

    Tests by Sargas’ five-metre high system of pressurised filters, absorbers and condensers at Vartan — processing 60 kilograms of exhaust gases an hour — are capturing 95% of carbon dioxide, the company claims.

    The system relies on existing technology adapted from the chemicals industry and would have to be 40 metres tall to work at full scale.

    The company said that the capture process costs just under US$20 a tonne of carbon dioxide and companies would need government help for storage — perhaps by pumping the gas into offshore oilfields to raise pressure and extract more oil.


Leave a Reply