Carbon capture and storage to commence in India with NTPC

This entry was posted by Saturday, 19 March, 2011
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National Thermal power corporation is an Indian company with expertise in power utilities, is better known as NTPC Ltd  in India.

 

Toshiba is the largest supplier of nuclear reactors in Japan. Given what has happened in Japan regarding the nuke melt down due to the earthquake and tsunami, Toshiba has to go slow on its nuclear division.

Whether the world is going to stop nuclear plants or not, there is going to be a slow down in new nuclear plants and in renewing old plants.

 

NTPC  is in talks with Toshiba Corp to build a pilot project in India to capture and store carbon emissions.

The Japanese power-equipment maker, Toshiba plans to develop its first 5-Mw carbon capture plant in India by 2016. This was confirmed by  Toshiba India Private Ltd Managing Director, Kenji Urai.

The project may be similar to the one set to start this year at a 47-Mw plant at Mikawa, Japan.

India plans to add about 64,000 Mw, or the equivalent of more than 50 new nuclear plants, in coal-fired electric plants in the five years through 2017. The country is seeking ways to reduce carbondioxide emissions, after agreeing to reduce the greenhouse gas in proportion to gross domestic product by 25 percent, compared to levels in 2005, by 2020.

 

It makes sense for India to build coal power plants with CCS technology.

Already the Government is facing stiff resistance for a coal fired power plant in Srikakulam, near Andhra.

India is a power starved country. India is probably the 5th largest co2 emitter. However, on a percapita basis, they are far below most other industrialised nations.

Carbon capture-and-storage technology typically traps emissions and pumps these underground, for what its promoters say is safe, permanent storage. So far, it has mostly been used in pilot projects and for storing only a portion of total plant emissions.

 

Critics say the cost is too high for its benefits. It’s certainly not economically feasible because  when with the  CCS equipment pre- fitted to a coal-based plant, it would double the investment.

Toshiba, Japan’s largest supplier of nuclear reactors, entered the Indian power market through a joint venture with Indian power utility JSW Energy Ltd.

 

Toshiba plans to sell $400 million of power-generation equipment in India by 2015. Through two joint ventures, Toshiba and JSW will open a plant in Chennai in July, to produce 3,000 Mw of boilers and turbines a year.

The joint venture is expecting orders from NTPC for four 660-Mw turbines this year and has already received orders for two 660-Mw turbines and generators from the Essar Group for its coal-fired Salaya plant in Gujarat.

The International Energy Agency supports carbon capture as a measure to limit greenhouse gases.

What happens when an earthquake hits the carbon geo sequestered, no one knows.

If  the leakage is slow, perhaps there will be time to do some damage control.

If all the co2 rushes out abruptly, it can cause mind boggling damage to mankind and climate.

The world needs about 3,400 projects,  by 2050 to reduce emissions.

 

Related Terms in the Glossary:

Carbon Capture and Storage

Greenhouse gas

 

3 Responses to “Carbon capture and storage to commence in India with NTPC”

  1. Arj Barkera

    The country’s flagship industrial efficiency program – the Perform Achieve and Trade (PAT) scheme – has been delayed. Scheduled for introduction in April, we now expect implementation by September, setting out details of energy improvement targets for 480-500 companies across eight industries.

  2. ani

    Two new patented sorbents used for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from coal-based power plants have moved closer to commercialization as a result of a licensing agreement between the Office of Fossil Energy’s (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES).

    The nonexclusive agreement facilitates negotiations on intellectual property rights, protects proprietary information, and grants non-exclusive licensing of the new technology. Under federal regulations, NETL is authorized to obtain, maintain, and own patent protection for its inventions, including those funded through collaborative agreements. By granting a commercial license for these sorbents, NETL can now convey and control the right to make, use, and sell the products and services claimed in the patent, thereby assuring strategic commercialization throughout the coal-fired power plant industry.

    CO2 capture is an important component of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, viewed by many experts as an integral part of a portfolio strategy (including increased use of renewable and nuclear energy, and greater efficiencies) for confronting increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions and potential climate change. Coal-based power and industrial plants are essential to U.S. energy production and are projected in many forecasts to remain so for the foreseeable future. But they are also among the most carbon-intensive energy sources.

    http://www.rdmag.com/News/2011/03/Energy-Technology-Two-NETL-Patented-Carbon-Capture-Sorbents-Closer-To-Commercialization/

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