CCS Projects in United Kingdom

This entry was posted by Monday, 21 March, 2011
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United Kingdom has several projects in CCS. The projects discussed in this paper are

1. Longannet Post Combustion Power plant

2. Ferrybridge Post Combustion Project

3. Powerfuel Hatfield

4. Killingholme Pre Combustion Project

5. Hunterston

 

Longannet Post Combustion Power Plant:

Longannet is the second largest power plant in UK and third largest coal-fired power station in Europe, generating 2400 MW of electricity. It is located on the upper Firth of Forth, close to the Central North Sea – an area that the best science shows is ideally suited to CO2 storage. The plant will produce 2 million tonnes per annum of carbon dioxide which will be transported by pipeline for storage in geological formations.  Longannet project is one of two projects still competing for funding in the first round of the UK government’s competition to demonstrate CCS in a coal-fired power station by 2014. Pre-feasibility was completed in 2009.  In March 2010 it was selected by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) as one of the two final bids in the UK.

The CO2 will be piped to the central North Sea oil/gas fields for safe storage. A detailed 12 month Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study is currently being carried out. Longannet is one of the 2 finalists, along with Kingsnorth, to receive 1 billion pounds for the UK CCS demonstration.

Facts:

Company/Alliance: Scottish Power, Shell, National Grid, Aker Clean Carbon

Location: Firth of Forth, Fife, Scotland, UK

Feedstock: Coal

Size: 330MW

Capture Method: Post Combustion

Capture Technology: Amine

Year of Operation: 2014

 

Ferrybridge Post Combustion Project:

In March 2010, Scottish and Southern Energy (SSE) was awarded funding of £6.3 million towards trialling post-combustion carbon capture technology at its Ferrybridge power station in West Yorkshire. Construction work is under way, with the trial itself expected to commence in 2011 and be complete by the end of 2012. The pilot project will collect around 100 tonnes of CO2 per day from a flue gas slipstream corresponding to about 5MW of electric power, and the technology will use an amine solvent that will be recycled after the CO2 has been extracted.

Facts:

Company/Alliance: Scottish and Southern Energy (SSE), Doosan Babcock, Siemens, and UK Coal

Location: Ferrybridge Station, West Yorkshire, England, UK

Feedstock: Coal

Size: 500 MW- Retrofit with supercritical boiler and turbine, 1.7 million tonnes of CO2 per year captured and stored

Capture Method: Post Combustion

Capture Technology: Amine

Year of Operation: 2011

 

Powerfuel Hatfield:

Powerfuel Power plans to build and operate a state-of-the-art 900MW integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CCS. In December 2009, the project was awarded funding of up to €180 million from the European Commission’s European Economic Recovery Plan. The venture has already completed a full FEED study and site preparation work is under way. Construction will take three to four years over two phases – the first phase allowing the plant to operate on natural gas until the second-phase coal gasification island with carbon capture is complete. At this stage, the plant will capture about 5 million tonnes of CO2 per year. The lifespan of the project will require storage of 190 million tonnes.

 

Facts:

Company/Alliance: Powerfuel, Kuzbassrazrezugol (KRU), and Shell UK

Location: Hatfield Colliery, South Yorkshire, England, UK

Feedstock: Coal

Size: 900MW

Capture Method: Pre Combustion

Capture Technology: IGCC

Year of Operation: 2014

 

Killingholme Pre Combustion Project:

Killingholme is a Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) comprising two 450MW modules giving a total generation capacity of 900MW. Following a period of mothballing, Killingholme Power Station was returned to service in 2005.This was the first time in the UK that a plant has been successfully returned to service following mothballing. The company had planned to fit pre-combustion carbon capture within a second phase at the proposed ₤1-billion “clean coal” power plant, with depleted gas fields under the North Sea earmarked as potential storage sites.

Facts:

Company/Alliance: E.ON UK, Powergen

Location: Killingholme, in Lincolnshire, UK

Feedstock: Coal

Size: 450MW

Capture Method: Pre Combustion

Capture Technology: IGCC

Hunterston:

In 2008 Peel Energy and DONG Energy established Ayrshire Power Limited as a joint venture to explore the possibility of building a 1600 MW power station at Hunterston in North Ayrshire. The Power station would burn both coal and biomass to produce up to 1852 MW of electricity. The current plans deal only with onsite carbon capture infrastructure, with the remaining offshore elements of the chain – transportation and storage – to be covered by future applications. The development includes two operating power units of 926MW capacity each, and a demonstration carbon capture unit with associated gas transfer plant. The operator will feed electricity into the UK’s National Grid.

Facts:

Company/Alliance: Ayrshire Power Limited

Location: Hunterston, Ayrshire, Scotland, UK

Feedstock: Coal

Size: 1600MW

Capture Method: Post Combustion

Capture Technology: Ammonia

Year of Operation: 2017

 

Other CCS projects in United Kingdom:

DECARBit project:

The DECARBit project links 21 partners from 10 European countries to fast track the development of pre-combustion carbon capture technologies for fossil fuel power plants – from experimental to full pilot testing stages. In 2010, the project entered its second phase, where pilot testing of selected pre-combustion capture technologies focuses on pre-combustion separation, oxygen separation and hydrogen combustion.

http://www.zeroco2.no/projects/decarbit-project

RWE npower – Blyth post-combustion project:

This is a feasibility study by RWE npower to build a 2400 MW supercritical clean coal power station on the site of the former Blyth Power Station. The new station would save over 3 million tonnes of carbon dioxide per year with facilities to burn carbon neutral fuels such as biomass at a later date. The power station would also be built carbon capture ready (post-combustion).

http://www.zeroco2.no/projects/rwe-npower-2013-blyth-post-combustion-project

Progressive Energy – Teesside pre-combustion project:

This is a project by Progressive Energy to potentially develop a 800 MW clean coal project with pre- combustion carbon capture and storage. Two new companies have been set up; Coastal Energy which will own the power station, and COOTS Ltd, which will own the CO2 pipeline assets.

http://www.zeroco2.no/projects/progressive-energy-2013-teesside-pre-combustion-project

RWE npower – Tilbury post-combustion project:

RWE npower has announced a feasibility study into the construction of a 1000 MW supercritical coal power station at Tilbury, Essex. The plant would incorporate post-combustion carbon capture and storage and could be operational by 2016, saving up to 90% of the plants carbon dioxide emissions per year.

http://www.zeroco2.no/projects/rwe-npower-2013-tilbury-post-combustion-project

RWE npower – Aberthaw post-combustion Project:

This plant is a 3 MW pilot plant, scaling up to 100 MW demonstration plant at Tilbury. RWE’s team included BOC (a Linde Group company), Cansolv Technologies Inc., I.M Skaugen SE, The Shaw Group Inc., and Tullow Oil. I.M.

http://www.zeroco2.no/projects/rwe-npower-2013-aberthaw-post-combustion-project

Renfrew test facility:

The test facility is stationed in Renfrew, 9.7 km west of Glasgow, Scotland. Doosan Babcock claims this to be the world’s largest carbon capture research facility. This facility uses Solvent Scrubbing Technology to capture CO2 from coal-fired flue gases, through a process of absorption and regeneration.

http://www.zeroco2.no/projects/renfrew

Kingsnorth post-combustion project:

In March 2010, E.ON’s proposals for Carbon Capture and Storage received part-funding from the UK’s Department of Energy and Climate Change towards a FEED study. Around the same time, the company submitted plans seeking environmental approval of a CO2 pipeline that would form part of the project. However, in October 2010, E.ON withdrew Kingsnorth from the government’s CCS competition, citing economic hurdles to the construction of the power plant. Its plans remain on hold.

http://www.zeroco2.no/projects/e.on-2013-kingsnorth-post-combustion-project

Department of Energy and Climate Change:

On March 17, 2010 a new office for CCS was started inside Department of Energy & Climate Change. The Office will set the strategic path for the use of CCS, facilitate the delivery of the demonstration programme, create the policy and support arrangements to stimulate private sector investment, and work with stakeholders to remove barriers to investment and development in the UK and globally. It will also look to maximize the domestic and global opportunities for UK businesses and the economy to benefit.

The Office is staffed by a dedicated team of Civil Servants, who are focused on helping to deliver CCS by:

  • Facilitating the development of CCS technology, including the UK demonstration programme,  innovation and funding
  • Working with stakeholders to ensure the wider framework for delivering CCS in the UK exists, including regulation, UK skills and capacity
  • Raising levels of understanding about CCS within governments, industry and public
  • Coordinating strategy and policy on CCS, including the wider potential for application to gas generation and industrial processes
  • Leading on the development of a roadmap, to guide future actions of CCS

 

UK Carbon Capture and Storage Community (UKCCSC):

UKCCSC is a collective of over 250 engineering, technological, natural, environmental, social and economic academic members with CCS interests. There are also roughly 250 industry, governmental and NGO stakeholders who are interested in UKCCSC and contribute to this diverse and vibrant network.

Objectives of UKCCSC:

  • Provide an  open forum for CCS academics to share results from ongoing work.
  • Produce online resources and a regular newsletter to encourage communication and facilitate dissemination of research outcomes.
  • Support earlier career researchers in their development through a targeted programme and participation in other UKCCSC activities.
  • Enable expansion of the academic CCS R&D community in the UK through active engagement of established academics who wish to broaden or redirect their skills to contribute towards R&D on CCS.
  • Improve communication of key research outcomes from the UK CCS R&D community to broad range of stakeholders.

 

UKCCSC is run by a secretariat (based at the University of Edinburgh) with strategic guidance provided by an Advisory Committee and an International Reference User Group. Academic members are comprised of over 250 engineering, technological, natural, environmental, social and economic academic members with CCS interests. Additionally, industry, governmental and NGO stakeholders contribute a further 250 to this growing network.

Current UK CCS Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Finding money to pay for Co2 emission reductions
  • Cost – effective businesses to deliver value
  • Co2 storage – liability issues and the role of government (but many problems avoided by going offshore)
  • Effective injection, storage and monitoring
  • Delivering value from offshore EOR – build on free C02
  • Post Combustion Capture Technology for retrofit
  • Second generation reference plants by 2020

 

The UK Energy Ministry received 9 applications for EU funding to build carbon capture projects in Britain with around 4.5 billion euros at stake. Europe’s biggest carbon emitting power plant Drax and Franc’s Alstom applied for funding to build a 426MW CCS project.Scottish and Southern Energy applied for funding for Carbon Capture and Storage from a 385MW gas fired unit at its Peterhead power plant in Scotland.Peel Energy had applied for CCS funding for a coal and biomass power station at Hunterston.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/02/10/us-britain-ccs-drax-alstom-idUSTRE71938H20110210

 

 

Sources:

http://sequestration.mit.edu/

http://www.ccsassociation.org.uk/ccs_projects/uk_projects.html

http://www.globalccsinstitute.com/resources/projects/longannet-clean-coal-power-station

http://www.eon-uk.com/generation/killingholme.aspx

http://www.peelenergy.co.uk/projects/ayrshire-power-station

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/what_we_do/uk_supply/energy_mix/ccs/occs/occs.aspx

http://www.geos.ed.ac.uk/ccs/early-career/gibbins.pdf

http://www.ukccsc.co.uk/

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/02/10/us-britain-ccs-drax-alstom-idUSTRE71938H20110210

 

Related Terms in the Glossary:

Carbon Capture and Storage

Carbon Sequestration

 

6 Responses to “CCS Projects in United Kingdom”

  1. Arj Barkera

    On top of the funding for the Green Investment Bank and the Carbon Price Support introduced in the budget, two additional pieces of legislation are in the works. The Energy Security and Green Economy Act is scheduled for finalisation by the end of the year, and contains the ‘green deal’ efficiency financing mechanism, which could set a model for other countries in Europe. A White Paper is also expected this month to set out the government’s detailed plans for Electricity Market Reform, which include a ‘feed-in tariff with a contract for difference, as well as capacity payments for generators.

  2. Duncan Kenneth

    The Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) has kicked off a “multi million pound” project that aims to develop cheaper carbon capture technologies for gas-fired power stations.

    The organisation announced a request for proposals yesterday targeting post-combustion technologies with low capital costs that can be retrofitted to existing Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) plants.

    The aim is to enable CCGT stations to be part of the expansion of carbon-capture and storage (CCS) implementation that is expected to take place in the 2020s and early 2030s.

    To date carbon capture technology has been mainly focused on coal-fired power stations in the UK to the extent that gas plant projects were excluded from the government’s demonstration competition.

    However, the next phase of the competition is open to gas projects, and European funding is equally supportive to coal and gas proposals.

  3. Duncan Kenneth

    Energy Trends and Quarterly Energy Prices publications are published on 31 March by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC). Energy Trends covers statistics on energy production and consumption, in total and by fuel, and provides an analysis of the year on year changes. Quarterly Energy Prices covers prices to domestic and industrial consumers, prices of oil products and comparisons of international fuel prices. A separate press release covering greenhouse gas emissions is also being released by DECC .

    http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/publications/trends/1512-pn11-031.pdf

  4. Angelina

    A new government funded report concludes that the carbon capture and storage industry is on the brink of a major expansion and could be worth as much as £10 billion to the UK by 2025. The study, conducted by Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), also claims that beneath the rocks of the Moray Firth is a century’s worth of carbon dioxide production.

    The report was issued just as the UK government is deciding between 14 energy projects, including nine involving carbon capture and storage, to put submit for European funding worth around £ 4 billion. SSE, Peel Energy, and Drax are among those seeking funding for CCS developments that include pre- and post-combustion as well as retrofit technology to be applied to gas and coal fired plants.

    Carbon capture and storage advocates acknowledge Scottish CCS has a vested interest in promoting the nation’s carbon storage potential, and the organization is vying benefit from UK government’s £1 billion CCS funding initiative.

  5. Eugenia

    UK expertise can help cut carbon emissions

    UK-based RockTron has developed a commercial mineral processing solution for the immense and growing environmental problem of coal-fired power station waste, called fly ash.

    Billions of tons of fly ash are dumped in long-term landfills worldwide. In Indonesia alone, an estimated 2 million tons of fly ash are currently produced a year, a figure predicted to doubled by 2013 due to the sharp increase in the number of coal-fired power plants in the country.

    “RockTron can transform fly ash into valuable eco-minerals on an industrial scale, with no solid waste stream,” RockTron head of marketing Peter Crofts said.

    http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2011/03/08/uk-expertise-can-help-cut-carbon-emissions.html

  6. Avinunu

    A new government funded report concludes that the carbon capture and storage industry is on the brink of a major expansion and could be worth as much as £10 billion to the UK by 2025. The study, conducted by Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), also claims that beneath the rocks of the Moray Firth is a century’s worth of carbon dioxide production.

    The report was issued just as the UK government is deciding between 14 energy projects, including nine involving carbon capture and storage, to put submit for European funding worth around £ 4 billion. SSE, Peel Energy, and Drax are among those seeking funding for CCS developments that include pre- and post-combustion as well as retrofit technology to be applied to gas and coal fired plants.

    Carbon capture and storage advocates acknowledge Scottish CCS has a vested interest in promoting the nation’s carbon storage potential, and the organization is vying benefit from UK government’s £1 billion CCS funding initiative.

    http://www.smartmeters.com/the-news/renewable-energy-news/2078-carbon-capture-and-storage-requires-extended-funding.html


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