Super critical coal power plant to come up in Malaysia

This entry was posted by Wednesday, 6 April, 2011
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Alstom to set up a 650 million euros, super critical  power generation equipment for a coal-fired power plant that will create enough electricity for nearly 2 million households in Malaysia.

The project is worth about US $ 1.4 b in total.

Alstom signed the contract with TNB Janamanjung Sdn Bhd to equip what it called southeast Asia’s first 1,000 megawatt supercritical coal-fired plant in Manjung. Supercritical plants operate at higher temperatures than normal coal-fired plants.

The high temperature increases the presure at which they operate, which in turns improves their efficiency, increasing the amount of power output and decreasing emissions per unit of fuel burned.

The development of coal fired supercritical power plant technology is best  described as an evolutionary advancement towards greater power output per unit and higher efficiency. Energy conversion efficiency of steam turbine cycle can be improved by increasing the main steam pressure and temperature.

Supercritical steam conditions are primarily attached to lower electricity costs through improved fuel economy, and with a modest increase in investments and high availability a sound economy of the concept is guaranteed.

As the  name super critical power plant,  suggests, coal-fired supercritical power plants operate at very high temperature and pressure (580 degree centigrade temp. with a pressure of 23 MPa) resulting much higher heat efficiencies (46%), as compare to sub-critical coal-fired plants which operates at 455 degree centigrade temp., and efficiency of within 40%. Some of the benefits of advanced supercritical power plants include:

(a) Reduced fuel costs due to improved plant efficiency;

(b) Significant improvement of environment by reduction in CO2 emissions;

(c) Plant costs comparable with sub-critical technology and less than other clean coal technologies;

(d) Much reduced NOx, SOx and particulate emissions;

(e) Can be fully integrated with appropriate CO2 capture technology

“Supercritical” is a thermodynamic expression describing the state of a substance where there is no clear distinction between the liquid and the gaseous phase.

Water reaches this state at a pressure above 22.1 MPa. The efficiency of the thermodynamic process of a coal-fired power describes how much of the energy that is fed into the cycle is converted into electrical energy. The higher the output of electrical energy for a given amount of energy input, the greater the efficiency. If the energy input to the cycle is kept at a constant, the output can be increased by selecting elevated pressures and temperatures for the water-steam cycle.

Increased thermal efficiency observed when the temperature and pressure of the steam isincreased. By raising the temperature from 580 °C to 760 °C and the pressure out of thehigh pressure feed-water pump from 33 MPa to 42 MPa, the thermal efficiency improvesby about 4% (Ultra-supercritical steam condition).

Current designs of supercritical plants have installation costs that are only 2% higher than those of sub-critical plants. Fuel costs are considerably lower due to the increased efficiency and operating costs are at the same level as sub-critical plants. Specific installation cost i.e. the cost per megawatt (MW) decreases with increased plant size. This plant concept fulfils the requirement to balance reliable power supply, sustainable use of existing resources and economic operation.

Alstom signed the contract with TNB Janamanjung Sdn Bhd to equip what it called southeast Asia’s first 1,000 megawatt supercritical coal-fired plant in Manjung. Supercritical plants operate at higher temperatures than normal coal-fired plants.

The plant is expected to come online in 2015, Alstom added in a statement on Monday.

TNB Janamanjung is a unit of Malaysia’s state-controlled Tenega Nasional power generation, transmission and distribution company.

 


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