Archive for category Solvents

Ionic Solutions for Carbon Capture – ION Engineering

Posted by on Friday, 12 February, 2010

ION Engineering has developed technology that could be used to economically remove CO2 and other contaminants from fossil fuel power plant emissions and raw natural gas.

According to ION Engineering, until now the state-of-the-art in current emissions control technology was the inefficient, aqueous (water-based) amine technology, but a breakthrough has seen the company become the first to successfully integrate ionic liquid solutions into carbon capture and emissions control technology by replacing the water based solution with ionic liquids – molten salts that do not evaporate. The company says that while recent developments in carbon capture technology have brought costs of carbon capture down to $50 to $100 a ton, its ionic liquid technology could cut the costs of capturing carbon dioxide from coal-fired power plants to as low as $20 a ton. This reduction is cost is mainly due to the fact that around 80% of the total cost of carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) comes from the capture of CO2 – the very area that the company’s system focuses on.

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At Longannet Plant, ScottishPower Claims Breakthrough in Carbon Capture

Posted by on Friday, 12 February, 2010

ScottishPower claims to have made a breakthrough in reducing the amount of energy required to separate carbon emissions at its coal-fired Longannet Power Station.

The testing at Longannet to assess the performance of the amine capture plant under a range of operating conditions has been underway since May this year.

Employing a mixture of process improvements and low energy solvents, technicians from ScottishPower and partner company Aker Clean Carbon say they has managed to reduce energy consumption by around a third.

Testing will continue for some more time, but the company believes the technology is ready for a full-scale demonstration.

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DOE CO2 Sequestration R&D Program – Breakthrough Ideas for Capturing, Storing CO2 Explored

Posted by on Friday, 12 February, 2010

DOE’s Carbon Sequestration R&D Program expands with addition of three university-sponsored projects

The three projects were selected in a broad competition run by the Energy Department’s National Energy Technology Laboratory. They were submitted by:

* University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX. Researchers in the University’s Department of Chemical Engineering will develop an alternative solvent that captures more carbon dioxide while using 25 to 50 percent less energy than conventional, state-of-the-art MEA (monoethanol amine) scrubbing, another CO2-removal method. Using less energy allows coal plants to produce more electricity while capturing and storing CO2. The university will develop and validate a process model to optimize solvent rate, stripper pressure and other parameters. Because gas/liquid contact and CO2 mass transfer would be enhanced, capital costs may be reduced.

* University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA, which proposes to study in a laboratory a deep-ocean CO2-sequestration method that blends liquid CO2, water and finely ground limestone into an emulsion that could be pumped into the ocean for long-term storage. Because this emulsion would weigh more than seawater, it would sink to the deep ocean. This would make it possible to CO2 at shallower depths than current directed-injection techniques. Soluble calcium bicarbonate, food for aquatic organisms, would be formed and stored in the ocean indefinitely.

* University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Lexington, KY. The University proposes to displace natural gas from black Devonian shales and use these organic-rich rocks to store CO2. Studies have shown that CO2 is preferentially adsorbed by gaseous coals in deep, unminable coal seams in very much the same manner that gas is naturally stored in these coals. In fact, CO2 displaces methane molecules two to one. The study will determine whether a similar phenomena takes place in Devonian black shales, which serve as both a source and a trap for natural gas.

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Advanced Solvents Used in B&W PGG CO2 Capture in Pilot Plant Tests

Posted by on Thursday, 11 February, 2010

Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group, Inc. (B&W PGG) researchers have successfully captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from a pilot-scale, coal-fired boiler using advanced solvents and a proprietary CO2-capture process developed at the company’s research center in Barberton, Ohio. B&W PGG is an operating unit of The Babcock & Wilcox Company.

B&W PGG has conducted its first demonstration on flue gas from a coal-fired boiler at the company’s Regenerable Solvent Absorption Technology (RSATTM) Pilot Plant. Researchers were able to continuously remove more than 90 percent of the CO2 from the Small Boiler Simulator II’s flue gas stream using a fully integrated RSAT process. B&W PGG researchers are now evaluating proprietary solvents and characterizing their performance at this scale.

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