Posts Tagged Copenhagen

Carbon emission reduction efforts by countries around the world

Posted by on Friday, 11 March, 2011

Thirty-two countries and 10 US states have emissions trading scheme.

California, one of the largest economies in the world, is due to start emissions trading next year.

Other countries, including China, Taiwan, Chile and South Korea, and a number of Canadian provinces, are either considering developing their own or already have trial emissions trading schemes in place. China has just announced its plans. CCS Projects in China

Carbon taxes are in place in Britain, Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands and Canada and under discussion elsewhere, including in the EU, Japan and South Africa.

Britain is going whole hog with several schemes for green products and incentives for them. EU – emission trading scheme (ETS) is popular as can be expected in Europe. EU Emission Trading Scheme

China has a tax on coal, oil and gas extraction in its largest gas-producing province and plans to extend this to all other western provinces.

India has nationwide tax of Rs 50 per tonne levied on both imported coal and coal produced domestically. The tax is insignificant and has not impacted the carbon economy. But the fact is they have also acted.

South Africa has released a discussion paper for public comment on a broad carbon tax. CCS in South Africa

Australia’s per capita emissions are high. The fact is that Australia has the highest per capita emissions of all developed countries, about 27 tonnes per person. This compares to a world average of about 6 tonnes per person, and an average of about 14 tonnes per person in other developed countries. Co2 emissions and CCS in Australia

A country’s total level of carbon pollution is important. And also important is the per capita emission.  About 20 countries responsible for about 80 per cent of the world’s emissions. The 80/20 rule works here too.

It is wrong to say that there is no action happening globally or that Copenhagen did not make important progress.

In Copenhagen all the big emitters pledged to reduce their carbon pollution. These pledges were formally incorporated into the United Nations process at the most recent negotiations, in Cancun last December.

Many countries, regions and states around the world are taking real action on climate change now.

Poland’s energy plan attempts to reduce its dependence on coal. The government has pledged to be a leader in carbon capture and storage technology. Carbon dioxide emission and carbon capture and storage in Poland

South Korea is the 9th largest Co2 emitter in the world. South Korea will start carbon emission trading scheme in January 2015. Carbon dioxide emission and carbon capture and storage in South Korea

There is this Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative in the US. . The RGGI scheme caps carbon pollution for the electricity sector in the 10 participating north-eastern states. The combined population for these 10 states is 50 million – more than double Australia’s total population. A very meagre percentage of India or china.

Each of these US State auctions pollution permits to power stations, and commits to use at least 25 per cent of their auction revenue for clean energy programs, and to assist consumers to reduce their use of electricity. Co2 emission & Carbon capture and storage in United States

In practice all participating states are far exceeding this commitment, investing 80 per cent of their proceeds – totaling $775 million so far – in renewable and energy efficiency programs.

Carbon Capture and Storage to commence in India with NTPC

 

Related Terms in the Glossary:

Carbon Emission Reduction Target

Emissions Trading

EU Emission Trading Scheme

Carbon Tax